Urban Landscape Workshop with Rex Beanland…

Attended the workshop at Swintons, which was aimed at fast and loose techniques for painting urban landscapes. Rex worked from basics to entire compositions, building confidence with people and crowds, buildings and streetscapes. He spends a  lot of time with each person, and moves through a lot of material in a weekend. I really enjoyed it, and would highly the workshop to anyone looking for new skills. Rex’s website is http://www.rexbeanland.com.

Snug Harbour on an Autumn Day

Last of the decent weather here on Georgian Bay (I will be driving back to Calgary shortly). I signed up locally for an excellent lesson on using acrylic paints. This is me testing my wings with a new medium! No doubt that there are a lot of obvious shortcomings (in my haste to mix colours, I forgot to line up the horizon; aaaiiiieee!)

Anyway, something new to add interest! See you all in October.

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High Alpine Sketching

I stopped yesterday while hiking up Mt Indefatigable on a ridge about 250 meters above Upper Kananaskis Lake, and was treated to spectacular views across Rawson Ridge on the far side to Mt Sarrail. Bright sunshine brought out the best colours in the glacier water, and the different shades of green in the trees. This sketch was finished on the spot. The wind was strong: I had to hold everything down, including my paint box! Water evaporated on the page almost instantly… Still, it was a great location.

In the shadow of Tom Thomson

Sketched this at the Parry Sound town dock a week ago, then finished the washes back at the cottage… I used a larger format than I usually do, allowing more detail.

Apparently the largest trestle east of the Rockies, and important at the time due to the booming timber industry. Tom Tomson drew the same view in 1914, after paddling up from Go Home Bay. The lumber mills that he saw  burned down shortly after… (see below; it should be obvious which one is his!)

I used to fish near this spot when we lived here in 1963 (As always, I rarely caught anything…).

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